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Posts Tagged ‘iguana cages’

The Younger Marine Iguanas Take The Dorsal Stripe Color Whereas The Adult Ones Are Grayish

By:Supercip

As its name suggests, the marine iguana is set apart from the rest of its relative mainly because it has a unique attribute of being capable to forage and live in the seawater. The marine iguana is in truth only to be found thriving within the Galapagos Islands that is why its existence in the island has branded the reptile the name “Galapagos marine iguana”. The natural habitat of the marine iguana is on the rocky shores of the Galapagos Island but they can likewise be seen in the mangrove and marshes beaches.

marine iguana

Some people such as Charles Darwin describe the marine iguanas as the black lizards thriving on the sea. But the truth is that the marine iguanas are not usually black in color. The younger marine iguanas take the dorsal stripe color whereas the adult ones are grayish. Their color may be really dull but there is a reason behind this. Such color allows them to easily absorb heat right after they emerge out of the water. Their food is usually the marine algae. They expel the remaining salts from their nasal glands as they go on with basking under the heat of the sun. The salt contained in their bodies makes their faces appear whiter.

More so, the matured male marine iguanas have a varying color—all of which depend on the existing season. During the breeding seasons, the adult male marine iguanas become teal-green or reddish in colors. Those thriving in Santa Cruz appear in black and red brick while those found in Fernandina come in dull green and brick red colors. Their sizes likewise differ which depends on the island that they live in. Those found in the whole of Isabela and Fernandina are the largest marine iguanas in the entire island of Galapagos. Meanwhile, the smallest marine iguanas are to be found in Genovesa.

As said to be poikilothermic animals, the marine iguanas can only spend very little time out in the cold sea whenever they dive for their algae food. Thus, they commonly swim within the very shallow water of the island. After swimming, they proceed to bask under the sun to have their bodies warmed up again. During the cold days, the marine iguana cannot effectively move thus making them too vulnerable for their predators. Since they cannot move fast, what they do is to strike their tails up in the air and bite their enemies. During the entire breeding season, the male marine iguanas mate with the females and likewise guard them against the rest of the male reptiles.

Moreover, the marine iguanas adjust their sizes to be able to adapt to the food condition in existence. There was a time during the onset of the El Niño when the algae decreased in number so the marine iguanas actually decreased in their lengths too. When the food supply started to normalize, the reptiles returned to their normal condition. The marine iguanas are not as fast as the rest of its relatives. When taken as pets, their predators become the dogs and cats. They can be easily attacked by these predators since they are too slow and much tamed.

To date, the government of Ecuador has set up laws that aim to protect the existence of marine iguanas. There are artificial nestling sites which had been made in the smaller islands so that there will be lesser predators that can harm them.

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Iguana

Get Acquainted with the Green Iguanas

By Supercip

The green iguanas or those which take the name of “Iguana iguana” are commonly found all over the South and Central America, in Mexico, in the southeastern part of Brazil, eastern Pacific, and the Caribbean. Breeds of the green iguana are now also spotted in Hawaii and Florida. The green iguana is popularly the largest type of lizard that happens to inhabit much of the territories of United States.

iguanas

iguanas

The Physical Description of the Green Iguana

In a matter of three years, the young twelve-gram green iguana can turn into a one kilogram adult green iguana. Right after they get hatched, their length varies from 17 to up to 25 centimeters. Most of the well-fed matured green iguanas come to weigh at about 4 and 6 kilograms but at times they reach the 8 kilogram weight.

The term green iguana does not stereotype these reptiles. The matured iguanas come in uniform colors whereas the younger ones vary between brown and green. Their colors can also get affected by their health, mood, temperature, and social statures.

One of the distinct features they have is the dewlap that can be found under their throats. The dewlap is much dominant in the male green iguanas rather than in the females. The laterally positioned eyes of the green iguanas are being protected by some immovable eyelids and mobile lower eyelids. The parietal eye functions as some kind of a meter for the solar energy and contributes much to the maturity of the endocrine and thyroid glands in these reptiles. Lastly, the plates or scales on their heads are much irregular and larger compared to the scales found on the rest of their body parts.

The Habitat of the Green Iguana

Arboreal lizards—these are what green iguanas are and they therefore enjoy living on top of tree canopies. The younger green iguanas tend to stay in the lower portions but the matured ones like it high above. This kind of dwelling technique allows them to do basking in the sun and they rarely go down with the exception of the time when the female green iguanas deem the need to dig their burrows so they can lay their eggs. They still prefer to have water around their habitat so that they can easily escape the predators who love to attack them. They are great swimmers so they most of the times successfully manage to avoid their predators.

The Development of an Iguana

Right after an estimated 65 days upon the mating period, the female green iguana is now ready to lay her eggs. The number and size of the eggs depend upon the size of the female iguana. Within a three-day period, about 10 to 30 pale-colored eggs get deposited into the nests. Other nests can be shared by many female iguanas especially when there is a very limited space for them. Actually, the female iguanas do not guard their nests but they do visit their eggs from time to time. The incubation for the iguana eggs last from about 90 up to 120 days. The hatchlings are the ones that crack their egg shells open by making use of their special egg teeth which are known as the caruncle. The yolks in the eggs are the providers of nourishment for the young iguanas.

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